Featured Articles

Can Fashion Help Small Farmers Preserve the Amazon?

On a rainy March afternoon, Rogério Mendes strides through the dripping vegetation of a tract of virgin Amazonian forest and stops at a tree with scars arranged in neat diagonal rows across its trunk. From his back pocket he produces a wood-handled tool with a blade on one end, called a cabrita, and cuts another diagonal line though the bark, beneath the others. A milky white goo—raw liquid latex—begins to trickle down this tiny canal and into a metal pail below. “I love being in the forest, it’s an inexplicable feeling,” says the 23-year-old, who sports a tattered canvas hat and a forearm inked with tree tattoos.

Can green rubber help protect the Amazon?

The New Republic and Food & Environment Reporting Network - Acre state, 2021


Other Selected Work

Pro-Bolsonaro Rallies May Be Prelude to Power Grab, Critics Say

President Jair Bolsonaro rallied a crowd of supporters in Brasília, the capital, on Brazil’s Independence day. As a subscriber, you have 10 gift articles to give each month. Anyone can read what you share. Critics see in the rhetoric of the leader, who is seeing declining poll numbers and mounting legal challenges, a parallel to former President Donald J. Trump’s. Pro-Bolsonaro Rallies May Be Prelude to Power Grab, Critics Say RIO DE JANEIRO — Beleaguered by declining poll numbers, a sputter

The ‘forgotten’ people picking your Brazil nuts

Photography and reporting at the Kaxarari indigenous territory for The Guardian, Diálogo Chino, and others - Brazilian Amazon, 2021

Cerrado: whose land is it?

Bahia state, 2018

Agribusiness boomtown; profits for a few, hardships for many

This is the fifth of six stories in a series by journalists Alicia Prager and Flávia Milhorance who travelled to the Cerrado in February for Mongabay to assess the impacts of agribusiness on the region’s environment and people. Driving up BR 020 into Luís Eduardo Magalhães, we’re greeted by huge soy storage silos, the property of Cargill, the transnational commodities company — leaving no doubt in anyone’s mind that we’ve arrived in the newest urban hotspot serving Brazil’s latest agribusiness

Traditional communities accuse agribusiness of ‘green land grabbing’

This is the fourth of six stories in a series by journalists Alicia Prager and Flávia Milhorance who travelled to the Cerrado in February for Mongabay to assess the impacts of agribusiness on the region’s environment and people. Barbed wire fencing – going up, and also torn down – are a sign of escalating tensions currently gripping rural areas of Formosa do Rio Preto, Western Bahia, Brazil. The municipality lies within the Cerrado, the vast Brazilian biome and savannah which is seeing rapid a

Appreciation grows for Brazil’s savannah, even as it vanishes

This is the first of six stories in a series by journalists Alicia Prager and Flávia Milhorance who travelled to the Cerrado in February for Mongabay to assess the impacts of agribusiness on the region’s environment and people. View a Cerrado series overview video here. We bounce down a potholed red sand road that cuts through a seemingly impenetrable green thicket that rises up on either side. It’s the wet season in Western Bahia state, Brazil, and the Cerrado blossoms. The long undervalued v

Audio: Impacts of agriculture on Brazil’s Cerrado region

On today’s episode: the impacts of agriculture on Brazil’s Cerrado region. Brazil’s Cerrado region is incredibly biodiverse, supporting more than 10,000 plant species, 900 birds, and 300 mammals. But it has long been overlooked by scientists and environmentalists alike, and as protecting the Amazon has become more of a priority in recent decades, much agricultural production in Brazil has moved from the rainforest to the vast Cerrado savannah. In February, Mongabay sent journalists Alicia Prag

Brazilian Media | Colaborações para o Brasil

Reporting from Sertão, 2018